Tag Archives: Teaching

#EnglishEd: How to Teach Apostrophes

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Image shows an example of how to teach apostrophes, demonstrating that an apostrophe acts as a divider to show possession. EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com is the URL pictured in the bottom right corner  of this pictograph. If you visit English Emporium, it offers an explanation for how to use the pictograph to make the apostrophe concept make sense to your students.

Please visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for great tips and tricks on how to teach concepts for English and reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This pictograph shows how to teach apostrophes in a way that students will understand and retain. Draw the pictograph on your whiteboard or show this pictograph on your projector. Explain that the apostrophe acts as a divider.

Let’s start with the red divider. The red divider shows that only one cow “owns” the spots we’re talking about.

The yellow divider shows that multiple cows “own” the spots.

Now that you’ve shown your students this pictograph, erase part of the “divider” line or project the following image:

Image shows an example of how to teach apostrophes, demonstrating that an apostrophe acts as a divider to show possession. EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com is the URL pictured in the bottom right corner of this pictograph. If you visit English Emporium, it offers an explanation for how to use the pictograph to make the apostrophe concept make sense to your students.

Please visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for great tips and tricks on how to teach concepts for English and reading.

The arrow still points to the owner of the spots.

For more examples and helpful tips on teaching apostrophes, please visit my apostrophes page, right here on English Emporium.

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#EnglishEd Vocabulary for #Teaching #Othello

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slave ship in alex haley's roots historical accuracy literary devices roots the saga of an american family

Image: iClipart

Here’s a straightforward list of vocabulary words I used when teaching Othello in my sophomore English classes. Hopefully you’ll find something useful here:

  • Rhetorical Question
  • Parenthetical Citation
  • Analysis
  • Opinion
  • Evidence
  • Quotation
  • Setting
  • Internal Conflict
  • External Conflict
  • Rising Action
  • Climax (in the literary sense)
  • Falling Action
  • Resolution
  • Author’s Theme
  • Symbolism
  • Foreshadowing
  • Irony
  • Plot Diagram

If you’re having your students write essays on a Shakespeare play, don’t forget to revisit my page on quotation marks. Once there, scroll down to “Quoting a Source,” for tips on teaching students how to quote a work of literature correctly.

List of Nonfiction Vocabulary Words #Reading #Literacy #Education

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Image shows a news article in a traditional newspaper.

EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com offers a free digital online English Handbook

You may wonder what qualifies me to offer up a list of nonfiction vocabulary terms. In the 20+ years that I’ve been employed as an educator, I have written reading curricula that has been used by two different school districts, and I’ve taught nonfiction literacy to fifth through eleventh graders.

Furthermore, when the state of Idaho established its first state-wide standardized tests, the materials I was using at that time were collected for the creation of our standardized tests, since the school where I was working at the time was one of 20 schools selected and surveyed for state-wide curricular analysis.

So now that we’ve established that I’ve got the credentials to create a nonfiction vocabulary list worth sharing, here’s the list of vocabulary terms I use when teaching nonfiction:

Nonfiction Vocabulary for High School English:

  • Inference
  • Explicit
  • Implicit/Imply
  • Point of View
  • Author’s Purpose
  • Author’s Motive
  • Author’s Bias
  • Authenticity
  • Propaganda
  • Primary Source
  • Thesis
  • Summary
  • Details
  • Biographical
  • Autobiographical
  • Chronological Order
  • Works Cited vs. Bibliography
  • Paraphrase
  • Plagiarism
  • Quotation
  • Parenthetical Citation
  • Angle Brackets vs. Square Brackets (and their purposes)
  • Writing Prompt
  • Endnotes
  • Footnotes
  • Superscript
  • Ellipses (and how they’re used when quoting a source)
  • Nonfiction Graphic Novel
  • Rhetoric
  • Evidence
  • Formal Outline

Nonfiction Vocabulary for Middle School Reading Classes:

  • Wikipedia
  • Hyperlink
  • URL
  • Worldbook Encyclopedia
  • Guide Words
  • Reference (the section in a library)
  • Dewey Decimal Classification System
  • Front Matter
  • Title Page
  • Subtitle
  • Publisher’s Information (and where it’s located in a book)
  • Table of Contents
  • Textbox
  • Caption
  • Illustration
  • Graphic
  • Graph
  • Chart
  • About the Author
  • Back Matter
  • Appendices/Appendix
  • Index
  • Timeline
  • Diagram
  • Biography
  • Autobiography

 

 

Topics for #ResearchPapers: #Artists List for #Teachers @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

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Image of a scanned list of artists and painters in alphabetical order.

Visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for more free teachers’ tools, worksheets, and lesson plans.

When I was a brand-new English teacher, I used to wonder what topics to use for research papers. The first time I tried teaching research papers, I let the students choose their own topics. Ha ha ha! Sure, I got some great research papers on skateboarding and Minecraft, but I also got some real duds.

One kid even did a so-called research paper on cow manure, just so he had an excuse to use the “sh” word in class when quoting local dairymen he had interviewed!

Kids can be soooo creative that way.

To help anyone who’s struggling with research papers, I’m going to post lists of possible research topics over the next few months. Today I’m starting with artists. Next I’ll post a list of inventors. And at the end of this series of blog posts, I’ll make a list of medieval research topics available to you.

I should also point out that English Emporium already has a ton of stuff on research papers available for you to download and print, including:

Hopefully there’s something useful in that stack of stuff I’ve used over the 23 years that I worked as an English teacher. If you like my free, printable worksheets, lesson plans, and activities, please show your appreciation by pinning these on Pinterest, tweeting about them, and/or sharing them through other social media. Just be sure to mention where you found them!

Icebreaker Activity for the First Day of School

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Handout with graphic organizer boxes and text questions like "what do you already know about (left blank for teacher to fill in)"

Image: EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

I realize it’s the end of the school year, not the beginning! But I wanted to offer the icebreaker that I used last year. It gave me an immediate summary of each kid and his/her special quirks. Just print this off and shove it in your desk until next year.

I photocopy the top portion to the back of the bottom portion, filling in the blank area on the bottom section with “this class,” so it reads, “What do you already know about this class? What do you think you know about this class but you’re not sure? Now write three questions you still have about this class.”

But this exit-and-entrance slip handout can be filled out so many different ways to help teachers of every subject make a quick assessment of what their students already know and what they still need to learn.

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!

Over the summer months, this blog focuses more on my adventures as a novelist and the lessons I’ve learned along the way. But when school starts again in the fall… I’ll be back with more free worksheets and activities for everyone!

#SixTraits Score Sheet for #LanguageArts / English #Teachers

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Printable score sheet which uses the six traits of good writing to score students and help them set goals for future writing projects.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit English Emporium.

This is the six traits scoring sheet I’ve used for many years. I’ve sort of perfected it over the years, including areas where the teacher writes a positive statement about what the student already does well and a constructive criticism area where the teacher writes a goal for the student to work on.

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!

Icebreaker Activity for the First Day of School

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How do teachers start their workday on the first day of school? It’s always nice to greet kids at the door with an icebreaker handout and a friendly smile! Here’s the icebreaker handout I use in my classroom on the first day of school:

Handout with graphic organizer boxes and text questions like "what do you already know about (left blank for teacher to fill in)"

Image: EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

I photocopy the top portion to the back of the bottom portion, filling in the blank area on the bottom section with “this class,” so it reads, “What do you already know about this class? What do you think you know about this class but you’re not sure? Now write three questions you still have about this class.”

But this exit-and-entrance slip handout can be filled out so many different ways to help teachers of every subject make a quick assessment of what their students already know and what they still need to learn.