Tag Archives: Othello

#EnglishEd Vocabulary for #Teaching #Othello

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Image: iClipart

Here’s a straightforward list of vocabulary words I used when teaching Othello in my sophomore English classes. Hopefully you’ll find something useful here:

  • Rhetorical Question
  • Parenthetical Citation
  • Analysis
  • Opinion
  • Evidence
  • Quotation
  • Setting
  • Internal Conflict
  • External Conflict
  • Rising Action
  • Climax (in the literary sense)
  • Falling Action
  • Resolution
  • Author’s Theme
  • Symbolism
  • Foreshadowing
  • Irony
  • Plot Diagram

If you’re having your students write essays on a Shakespeare play, don’t forget to revisit my page on quotation marks. Once there, scroll down to “Quoting a Source,” for tips on teaching students how to quote a work of literature correctly.

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10min #PuppetShow of #Othello for #EnglishTeachers and #Renfaire fans

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As I’ve promised, this is the puppet show we made in my sophomore English classes during the 2015-1016 school year. You’re welcome to use this in your classroom, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning the video with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages.) If you want the puppet patterns, they’re free to download on this website. Just click on “Shakespeare, William” in the list of Categories in the right-hand margin.

I’ve also created a number of sewing patterns for Barbie-sized dolls in a video production of Romeo and Juliet. If you’d like to see my free, printable sewing patterns for Renaissance costumes for dolls, please visit my most popular website, ChellyWood.com.

Also, if the school where you teach offers a Secret Santa program, you might want to check out my Secret Santa blog at that link. It offers free poems, craft patterns, and gift ideas for Secret Santas/Secret Pals.

FREE Printable #ShakespeareSunday Puppet Pattern for #EnglishTeachers and #Thesbians

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Image of two-dimensional paper puppet pattern pieces, including arms, legs, head, and clothing items. Overlay says, "English Emporium dot Word Press dot com."

Visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for more free patterns and printables for English teachers.

Yes, here’s the female puppet pattern I created for my students to use in my sophomore English classes during the 2015-1016 school year. You’re welcome to download and/or print this for use in your own classroom, but please be so kind as to help promote this website by sharing, liking, and/or pinning the image. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages.)

Next month I’ll release the video showing how we used these puppets in a video production of Shakespeare’s Othello. However, this puppet will work for nearly any play with a medieval or Renaissance setting.

If you’ve just stumbled across this post, the easiest way to find more Shakespeare teacher tricks, tips, and tools is to click on “Shakespeare, William” in the side margin’s menu.

I’ve also created a number of sewing patterns for Barbie-sized dolls in a video production of Romeo and Juliet. If you’d like to see my free, printable sewing patterns for Renaissance costumes for dolls, please visit my most popular website, ChellyWood.com.

Free, printable male #Shakespeare Character Puppet for #English #Curriculum

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Image of puppet blackline master for use in the English classroom with Shakespearean plays like Othello, Romeo and Juliet, and other Renaissance or medieval settings. (Costume worn by puppet would suit a Renaissance or medieval setting.) Overlay says: "English Emporium dot Word Press dot com."

Please visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com to see lesson plans and sample videos showing how to use this puppet in the English classroom.

Yes, here’s the puppet pattern I created for my students to use in my sophomore English classes during the 2015-1016 school year. You’re welcome to download and/or print this for use in your own classroom, but please be so kind as to help promote this website by sharing, liking, and/or pinning the image. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages.)

Next month I’ll post the female puppet pattern, and in September, I’ll release the video showing how we used these puppets in a video production of Shakespeare’s Othello. However, this puppet will work for nearly any play with a medieval or Renaissance setting.

If you’ve just stumbled across this post, the easiest way to find more Shakespeare teacher tricks, tips, and tools is to click on “Shakespeare, William” in the side margin’s menu.

I’ve also created a number of sewing patterns for Barbie-sized dolls in a video production of Romeo and Juliet. If you’d like to see my free, printable sewing patterns for Renaissance costumes for dolls, please visit my most popular website, ChellyWood.com.

#Othello Paper Doll Project for #English #Teachers

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Image of two boys cutting out paper dolls

Image: iClipart

I’ve been doing a lot of blog posts for writers lately and neglecting my English teacher friends out there in Cyberspace. So today’s blog post is just a quick idea that I used, with great success, while teaching Shakespeare’s Othello.

First, I had students read aloud, taking parts in the play, in the traditional way. Then I offered an “intermission” game to keep students from getting bored. At the end of class, after the “intermission” was over, we went back to reading, if time allowed.

For our first intermission game, students had to design a stage on a piece of over-sized paper. Students drew and colored their stage, and they were allowed to have curtains and a few simple props like a table and chairs or archways in the background.

For the next day’s intermission, I had the students cut out paper dolls that were wearing Renaissance “underwear,” and they had to design, cut out, and glue costumes to fit these paper dolls. I had to give the kids construction paper for the costumes, and I provided everyone with scissors and glue.

The third day’s intermission was a chance for students to paste their paper dolls on the stage for specific scenes from Othello.

Now I teach sophomores, and at first, I worried the students would think this project was ridiculous and childlike. But I was pleasantly surprised to discover it was a lot of fun for them. In fact, one class didn’t get to finish their intermission project due to time constraints, and they were pretty upset about it!

So even if you teach high school students, it’s worth giving this activity a shot. If nothing else, the paper doll project will help them envision the stage as they read the play, and that’s a good thing.

To find some awesome renaissance paper dolls on the Internet, google an artist named Tom Tierney. He has paper dolls in Renaissance attire, pilgrim paper dolls, and ethnic paper dolls.

#9. Step up the pace to finish a classic.

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Wondering what this blog is all about? We’re a group of students reading works of classic literature and blogging about the experience.

For today’s blog topic, let’s check our progress. Submit a comment that does the following:

  1. State the title and author.
  2. Summarize the plot of the story so far.
  3. Tell (honestly) what page you’re on.
  4. Re-assess your time frame for completing the book.
  5. Set a new goal if you need to.

How many pages per day do you need to get through, in order to finish the book before the end of the quarter? If we start typing our final exam on March 9th, that means we have about 17 more school days left before we need to finish our books (not including weekends).

If you’re not keeping up, step up the pace. Set a new goal for how many pages you need to read each day, in order to finish.

The plan is:

  • On March 7th, Mrs. Sparhawk hands out the final exam.
  • On March 8th we complete the last of our online journals.
  • On March 9th, we begin typing the first draft of our final exams. We get to work on these March 9th, 10th, and 11th.
  • On March 11th, we print our first draft.
  • On March 14th and 15th, we edit in the classroom.
  • On March 16th, 17th, and 18th, we type up the final draft of our final exams.
  • Mrs. Sparhawk collects our final exams on the 18th.

So as of today, we’ve nearly reached the middle of the quarter. Are you half-way through your book yet? If not, you might want to step up the pace to meet the deadline.