Tag Archives: English

#EnglishEd: How to Teach Apostrophes

Standard
Image shows an example of how to teach apostrophes, demonstrating that an apostrophe acts as a divider to show possession. EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com is the URL pictured in the bottom right corner  of this pictograph. If you visit English Emporium, it offers an explanation for how to use the pictograph to make the apostrophe concept make sense to your students.

Please visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for great tips and tricks on how to teach concepts for English and reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This pictograph shows how to teach apostrophes in a way that students will understand and retain. Draw the pictograph on your whiteboard or show this pictograph on your projector. Explain that the apostrophe acts as a divider.

Let’s start with the red divider. The red divider shows that only one cow “owns” the spots we’re talking about.

The yellow divider shows that multiple cows “own” the spots.

Now that you’ve shown your students this pictograph, erase part of the “divider” line or project the following image:

Image shows an example of how to teach apostrophes, demonstrating that an apostrophe acts as a divider to show possession. EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com is the URL pictured in the bottom right corner of this pictograph. If you visit English Emporium, it offers an explanation for how to use the pictograph to make the apostrophe concept make sense to your students.

Please visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com for great tips and tricks on how to teach concepts for English and reading.

The arrow still points to the owner of the spots.

For more examples and helpful tips on teaching apostrophes, please visit my apostrophes page, right here on English Emporium.

Advertisements

#EnglishEd Vocabulary for #Teaching #Othello

Standard
slave ship in alex haley's roots historical accuracy literary devices roots the saga of an american family

Image: iClipart

Here’s a straightforward list of vocabulary words I used when teaching Othello in my sophomore English classes. Hopefully you’ll find something useful here:

  • Rhetorical Question
  • Parenthetical Citation
  • Analysis
  • Opinion
  • Evidence
  • Quotation
  • Setting
  • Internal Conflict
  • External Conflict
  • Rising Action
  • Climax (in the literary sense)
  • Falling Action
  • Resolution
  • Author’s Theme
  • Symbolism
  • Foreshadowing
  • Irony
  • Plot Diagram

If you’re having your students write essays on a Shakespeare play, don’t forget to revisit my page on quotation marks. Once there, scroll down to “Quoting a Source,” for tips on teaching students how to quote a work of literature correctly.

#TimeSavers for #English and #LanguageArts teachers @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

Standard
Printable score sheet which uses the six traits of good writing to score students and help them set goals for future writing projects.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

This is the six traits of writing score sheet that I used for more than 20 years in my English classroom. I like it a lot because it offers sections for “What you do well” and “What you need to work on.”

Remember that the PowerPoint scoring guides I’ve created (and editing guides) are available on this page in English Emporium, so if you want, you can use these PowerPoints to have the students self-score or score each other. That can save an English teacher a LOT of time!

You’re welcome to use this in your classroom, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning it with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages where you can find this post, if it’s a recent one.)

Also, if the school where you teach offers a Secret Santa program, you might want to check out my Secret Santa blog at that link. It offers free poems, craft patterns, and gift ideas for Secret Santas/Secret Pals. The holidays creep up on us awfully quickly!

10min #PuppetShow of #Othello for #EnglishTeachers and #Renfaire fans

Standard

As I’ve promised, this is the puppet show we made in my sophomore English classes during the 2015-1016 school year. You’re welcome to use this in your classroom, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning the video with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages.) If you want the puppet patterns, they’re free to download on this website. Just click on “Shakespeare, William” in the list of Categories in the right-hand margin.

I’ve also created a number of sewing patterns for Barbie-sized dolls in a video production of Romeo and Juliet. If you’d like to see my free, printable sewing patterns for Renaissance costumes for dolls, please visit my most popular website, ChellyWood.com.

Also, if the school where you teach offers a Secret Santa program, you might want to check out my Secret Santa blog at that link. It offers free poems, craft patterns, and gift ideas for Secret Santas/Secret Pals.

#Teach the Steps in the #WritingProcess With This #Educational Video!

Standard


This isn’t one of my own videos, but I found it covers a lot of the stuff we English teachers focus on in the classroom. It’s fun to watch the narrator draw himself as he goes through the steps in the writing process too.

If you want a simpler, shorter, review-style video of the steps in the writing process, here’s the one I created. It goes through the same steps that are on the handout I posted last week.

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!

#SixTraits Score Sheet for #LanguageArts / English #Teachers

Standard
Printable score sheet which uses the six traits of good writing to score students and help them set goals for future writing projects.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit English Emporium.

This is the six traits scoring sheet I’ve used for many years. I’ve sort of perfected it over the years, including areas where the teacher writes a positive statement about what the student already does well and a constructive criticism area where the teacher writes a goal for the student to work on.

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!