Tag Archives: English teachers

Vocabulary for Teaching Epic Poetry and World Poets #Poetry #Poets #EnglishEd

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Image shows portraits of Shakespeare, Robert Burns, John Keats, Goethe, Edgar Allen Poe, Robert Browning, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and John Milton

Image: iClipart

When I was teaching sophomore English, the curriculum emphasized world literature rather than American literature. I tried to focus our study of poetry on world poets, with a whole section devoted to the epic poem.

Today I’m sharing with you, my fellow educators, the vocabulary words I covered during my quarter on epic poetry and world poets:

  • Allude
  • Literal Interpretation
  • Figurative Interpretation
  • Motif
  • Mood
  • Plot
  • Narrative Poetry
  • Epic Poetry
  • Point of View
  • Satire
  • Symbolism
  • Style
  • Metaphor
  • Simile
  • Alliteration
  • Cultural Identity
  • Historical Significance
  • Overtones
  • Saga
  • Trickster
  • Legend

Hopefully you’ll find this list helpful for your own classroom study of world poets.

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Free #goalSetting wksht for #languageArts #teachers

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Printable writing log with boxes for setting goals and reflecting on the six traits of writing.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

Printable writing log with boxes for setting goals and reflecting on the six traits of writing.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

Goal setting is so important for students! This goal-setting handout was something I gave my students at the start of the school year, and we tried to fill every box with writing scores by the end of the school year. It was a challenging goal to accomplish, but if you give scores for first and final drafts of a single paper, it’s not impossible.

And in case you missed last month’s post, I have a six traits scoring form that matches this goal-setting chart. I also have a number of PowerPoints that guide students through self-evaluation or peer-evaluation of writing, to save the English/language arts teacher time.

You’re welcome to use this goal-setting chart with your students, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning it with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages where you can find this post, if it’s a recent one.)

 

#TimeSavers for #English and #LanguageArts teachers @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

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Printable score sheet which uses the six traits of good writing to score students and help them set goals for future writing projects.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

This is the six traits of writing score sheet that I used for more than 20 years in my English classroom. I like it a lot because it offers sections for “What you do well” and “What you need to work on.”

Remember that the PowerPoint scoring guides I’ve created (and editing guides) are available on this page in English Emporium, so if you want, you can use these PowerPoints to have the students self-score or score each other. That can save an English teacher a LOT of time!

You’re welcome to use this in your classroom, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning it with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages where you can find this post, if it’s a recent one.)

Also, if the school where you teach offers a Secret Santa program, you might want to check out my Secret Santa blog at that link. It offers free poems, craft patterns, and gift ideas for Secret Santas/Secret Pals. The holidays creep up on us awfully quickly!

Use the #LibraryOfCongress to Help Inspire Your #CivilWar Journal #WritingPrompts (Links @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com)

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Image of Civil War soldier William H. Rockwell holding rifleThe Library of Congress has been quite a blessing to me, as my students have read Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage. Did you know the Library of Congress offers a plethora of photographs taken during the American Civil War? It’s an amazing collection!

 

The picture I’m showing here is one I used with some of my students’ daily journal-writing. Here are some of the prompts I’ve offered during one week in October, when we first started reading the classic novel:

Monday, Oct. 26:  Turn to the very first page of Chapter 1 in Stephen Crane’s novel, Red Badge of Courage.  Look at the bottom of the page. One of the last sentences is about a Negro teamster. This is the only black person mentioned in this entire Civil War novel. Copy those two, brief sentences from the book into your notes and write a sentence or two describing the irony of a Civil War novel that has so few African American characters in it. (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Take a good look at the photograph of Private William H. Rockwell of North Carolina (right). Imagine how old he was when this photograph was taken. Write a paragraph describing him. Include a description of the family he left behind when he went to war, the education he received before he went to war, and the type of person he was. (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Wednesday, Oct. 28: Look back at Yesterday’s journal. How are Stephen Crane’s character of Henry Fleming and your description of Private William H. Rockwell alike? How are they different? (If you were absent Monday, just take a look at a classmate’s journal to do this.) Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.

Thursday, Oct. 29:  How would Red Badge of Courage be different if told from the point of view of an African American soldier in the Union Army? (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Hobbit Topic #24

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teacher lesson the hobbit drawings student pictures of characters

Image: iClipart

If you’re ready for Hobbit Topic #24, then you’ve read to page 250. When you come to class today, your teacher will hand you a piece of computer paper. On this page, draw a character from The Hobbit. (Perhaps your teacher will assign you a specific character.) Here are your artistic requirements for this journal entry:

  • Locate a description of that character in the book and pay close attention to how he/she/it is described.
  • Fill the entire page with your drawing. Don’t make the image too small, please.
  • If time allows, color your character, using colored pencils.
  • Label your character with a heading or title, using bubble letters that are easy to see from afar.

At the end of class, you will be asked to present your character, so if you have extra time, look through the pages of The Hobbit until you find action involving that character. Jot down a few things that are important to remember about your character.

For teachers: I’m attaching the assignment sheet that I used. You can just type over my students’ names and replace them with your own. I cut out each assignment and handed it to the students in class. Here’s the link to download this document: Character Art Assignments for The Hobbit

Students, you’re welcome to add comments regarding your opinion of this journal assignment, but they will not be counted as extra credit.

Hobbit Topic #11

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student writing projects peer editing

Image: iClipart

After reading to page 130, go back to Hobbit Topic #8 and read through everyone’s comments there. Copy/paste a comment from someone, tell whose comment it is, and critique them on a.) what their comment does well and b.) what their comment needs work on. Here’s an example:

CooperStudent10 wrote:

I was retreating from the goblins with a slight disadvantage because I had Bilbo on my back. I then felt the hand of a goblin on my leg and i new Bilbo and I were headed towards the ground. I scrambled back up to my feet and shouted “follow me everybody” assuming that Bilbo was right behind me. Everyone was tripping over bodies and at one point I almost was beheaded by Gandolf’s sword Glamdring. There was no time to count the followers and I never realized we had left Bilbo until we had passed through the gate guards and gate door and down to where Bilbo found us.

Here’s what Cooper did well:

  1. He remembered to use first person personal point of view (saying I did this or that instead of he did this or that).
  2. He remembered that Gandolf’s sword is called Glamdring and he called the sword by name, just like the characters do in the novel.
  3. He builds suspense by describing the goblin’s hand on his leg.
  4. He uses adult-sounding vocabulary like “assuming” and “disadvantage” and he uses active verbs like “scrambled,” “retreating,” and “beheaded.”

What he needs to work on:

  1. He forgot to tell us whose point of view he has chosen.
  2. He forgot to capitalize the word “Follow” in the statement, “Follow me everybody!” and he probably should’ve ended that statement with an exclamation point.
  3. He misspelled “knew.”
  4. He pretty much just re-tells what the book already says, but I think it would’ve been more interesting if he had added a few more creative elements, using the imagination that I know he possesses. CooperStudent10 is a really creative guy, so he probably would’ve added cool fight scenes or something, if he’d taken the time to think that sort of thing up instead of just saying what’s already in the book.

NOTE: If you list four criticisms, you should list four things they do well. If you criticize three things, be sure to give three positive comments too. Don’t go too heavy on the criticisms, please!