Tag Archives: educators

#TimeSavers for #English and #LanguageArts teachers @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

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Printable score sheet which uses the six traits of good writing to score students and help them set goals for future writing projects.

For more free printable templates, classroom activities, and teacher tools, visit EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

This is the six traits of writing score sheet that I used for more than 20 years in my English classroom. I like it a lot because it offers sections for “What you do well” and “What you need to work on.”

Remember that the PowerPoint scoring guides I’ve created (and editing guides) are available on this page in English Emporium, so if you want, you can use these PowerPoints to have the students self-score or score each other. That can save an English teacher a LOT of time!

You’re welcome to use this in your classroom, but please show your appreciation by sharing, liking, and/or pinning it with a link back to this website. Thanks! (Those links, by the way, will take you to my various social media pages where you can find this post, if it’s a recent one.)

Also, if the school where you teach offers a Secret Santa program, you might want to check out my Secret Santa blog at that link. It offers free poems, craft patterns, and gift ideas for Secret Santas/Secret Pals. The holidays creep up on us awfully quickly!

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Icebreaker Activity for the First Day of School

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Handout with graphic organizer boxes and text questions like "what do you already know about (left blank for teacher to fill in)"

Image: EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

I realize it’s the end of the school year, not the beginning! But I wanted to offer the icebreaker that I used last year. It gave me an immediate summary of each kid and his/her special quirks. Just print this off and shove it in your desk until next year.

I photocopy the top portion to the back of the bottom portion, filling in the blank area on the bottom section with “this class,” so it reads, “What do you already know about this class? What do you think you know about this class but you’re not sure? Now write three questions you still have about this class.”

But this exit-and-entrance slip handout can be filled out so many different ways to help teachers of every subject make a quick assessment of what their students already know and what they still need to learn.

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!

Over the summer months, this blog focuses more on my adventures as a novelist and the lessons I’ve learned along the way. But when school starts again in the fall… I’ll be back with more free worksheets and activities for everyone!

Blank SIOP #LessonPlan Template for Use in Any #Educators’ #Classroom

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Blank SIOP lesson plan template for teachers to use in the Geography classroom.

For more free lesson plan templates and student activities, visit English Emporium.

 

This is the second half of the geography common core checklist template that I posted last week; however this second half is more of a lesson planner. It would be suitable for any subject. A friend of mine told me he designed this lesson plan template himself, but he gave me permission to post it on my blog. (Thanks Jeff!)

If you like my free printable worksheets, game ideas, and educational videos, please show your appreciation by liking, tweeting, and pinning! Thanks!

Use the #LibraryOfCongress to Help Inspire Your #CivilWar Journal #WritingPrompts (Links @ EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com)

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Image of Civil War soldier William H. Rockwell holding rifleThe Library of Congress has been quite a blessing to me, as my students have read Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage. Did you know the Library of Congress offers a plethora of photographs taken during the American Civil War? It’s an amazing collection!

 

The picture I’m showing here is one I used with some of my students’ daily journal-writing. Here are some of the prompts I’ve offered during one week in October, when we first started reading the classic novel:

Monday, Oct. 26:  Turn to the very first page of Chapter 1 in Stephen Crane’s novel, Red Badge of Courage.  Look at the bottom of the page. One of the last sentences is about a Negro teamster. This is the only black person mentioned in this entire Civil War novel. Copy those two, brief sentences from the book into your notes and write a sentence or two describing the irony of a Civil War novel that has so few African American characters in it. (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Take a good look at the photograph of Private William H. Rockwell of North Carolina (right). Imagine how old he was when this photograph was taken. Write a paragraph describing him. Include a description of the family he left behind when he went to war, the education he received before he went to war, and the type of person he was. (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Wednesday, Oct. 28: Look back at Yesterday’s journal. How are Stephen Crane’s character of Henry Fleming and your description of Private William H. Rockwell alike? How are they different? (If you were absent Monday, just take a look at a classmate’s journal to do this.) Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.

Thursday, Oct. 29:  How would Red Badge of Courage be different if told from the point of view of an African American soldier in the Union Army? (Add this entry to your latest chapter notes.)

Icebreaker Activity for the First Day of School

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How do teachers start their workday on the first day of school? It’s always nice to greet kids at the door with an icebreaker handout and a friendly smile! Here’s the icebreaker handout I use in my classroom on the first day of school:

Handout with graphic organizer boxes and text questions like "what do you already know about (left blank for teacher to fill in)"

Image: EnglishEmporium.WordPress.com

I photocopy the top portion to the back of the bottom portion, filling in the blank area on the bottom section with “this class,” so it reads, “What do you already know about this class? What do you think you know about this class but you’re not sure? Now write three questions you still have about this class.”

But this exit-and-entrance slip handout can be filled out so many different ways to help teachers of every subject make a quick assessment of what their students already know and what they still need to learn.

Great Gift Ideas for Teachers on Teacher Appreciation Day

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Are you looking for a place where you can find fantastic gift, food, and card ideas for teachers? I’ve got just the place!

I run a website called Secret Pal Teachers, where I post some of the creative gifts that people have given me (or that I’ve given other teachers). It started out as a blog about Secret Santa, but I found it was too much fun to stop after the holidays.

The card below is just one of my creations that you can find on Secret Pal Teachers. You should go check it out for Teacher Appreciation Day!

poem for teacher appreciation week

Images: iClipart
Design: ChellyWood.com

Step-by-Step Guide for Teaching Kids How to Use Wikipedia Correctly in the Computer Lab

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Last week I posted my Wikipedia Research Worksheet. (That link only shows page 1; you have to go back to the “blog” section to see the whole document.)

This week I’m offering a companion to the Wikipedia Research Worksheet: a step-by-step guide that shows kids how to fill out last week’s handout without too much prompting from the teacher.

As always, I appreciate when teachers use my stuff, if they also like it, tweet about it, and or spread the word about this website in some other way. Thanks!

Here’s your step-by-step guide for teaching kids how to use Wikipedia correctly in the computer lab at your school. It even shows them how it should be cited in their final essay and/or research document:

Free Printable Handout on How to Cite Wikipedia for Middle Schoolers

Document Created by Chelly Wood