Read a Classic to Earn Extra Credit

Standard
middle school reading class assignment for extra credit

Image: iClipart

This quarter’s extra credit will require students to read a classic novel. Mrs. Sparhawk can tell you whether or not the book you’ve chosen is truly a “classic” in the traditional sense.

Each week she’ll post a new question regarding classic novels. It will be an open-ended question, like “Describe your novel’s protagonist in 3-5 sentences.” It doesn’t matter which classic novel you read, a question like that is easy enough to answer.

So if you want extra credit this quarter, you’ve got to check out a classic novel. You must also use good spelling, grammar, and punctuation (as always) to earn extra credit this way. So don’t just plunk out random answers to the weekly question. Think hard about how you’re going to answer. Check your spelling. Use your “English Handbook Pages” to make sure you’re using commas correctly and such. All of these things count.

If you love to invent stories, you may also participate in “Creative Writing Prompts” this quarter, but these will not be available as extra credit anymore, as we’re doing a lot more creative writing in class this quarter than we’ve done in the past. So this quarter, if you submit a story under “Creative Writing Prompts,” it will simply be for fun (so other people can read your inventive stories). It won’t be for credit.

Furthermore, to earn extra credit this quarter, you’ve got to submit your response to this week’s “Journal Online” question during the week in which it was posted. Late comments will not receive extra credit. However, you may jump in and join the “Journal Online” forum any time you wish–next week, the week after, etc…

This week’s extra credit opportunity is simple enough. Check out a classic novel at the library. Make sure it’s a “classic” by asking Mrs. Sparhawk for her approval. Then comment with a list of the following:

  • Title
  • Author’s Name
  • Number of Pages
  • A sentence or two explaining why you chose that book.
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One response »

  1. 1. GULLIVER’S TRAVELS
    2. Jonathan Swift.
    3. 192 pages
    4. I chose this book because I have always seen it but could never really read it until now.

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