22. Twenty authors. Twenty five ideas.

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educational lesson plans the call of the wild pride and prejudice dickens christmas carol

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You’ve read a classic novel. You’ve learned about the plot, the setting, the characters, the author, and even the time period in which the novel takes place. Now find out what other people have to say about the novel you’ve read and/or its author.

One of the best places to look is at the bottom of your novel’s Wikipedia page. You can find links to resources that may even be educational.

If that’s not helping, try to google your author and/or novel title. You may even find essays other students have written about your book.

For this journal, summarize some of the information and/or opinions you discover in your web search. List five ideas that hadn’t already occurred to you about your novel and/or its author. Don’t forget to mention your title and author. Here’s an example:

I’ve finished reading Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Here are five things I learned today that surprised me:

  1. It appears this novel is not in copyright, according to California Digital Library’s web site, and I found its Kindle edition is free on amazon.com, so that must be correct.
  2. There’s a seafood restaurant chain called “Long John Silver’s” and it’s named after the antagonist in my book.
  3. The film version that I love best, starring Charlton Heston and Christian Bale is no longer in print, and it has never been released in DVD form–which lots of Amazon customers have complained about. It has a five-star rating on amazon.com, even though it got some bad reviews when it first came out in theaters.
  4. Some real locations lay claim to being the inspiration for Stevenson’s setting. Norman Island in the British Virgin Islands, for example, may have inspired Stevenson, because his uncle supposedly told Stevenson stories about it when he was just a kid. Llandoger Trow is an inn in Bristol which claims to be the origin of the Admiral Benbow Inn.
  5. The name of Israel Hands was taken from an actual crew member aboard the real pirate Blackbeard’s ship. The real Israel Hands was shot in the knee by Blackbeard, to keep his crew afraid of him!
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15 responses »

  1. I am reading Jane Eyre.
    1.”‘A little, plain, provincial, sickly-looking old maid’, is how George Lewes described Charlotte Brontë to George Eliot.”
    2.In Jane Eyre Charlotte used her experiences at the Evangelical school and as governess. The novel severely criticized the limited options open to educated but impoverished women, and the idea that women “ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.” Jane’s passionate desire for a wider life, her need to be loved, and her rebellious questioning of conventions, also reflected Charlotte’s own dreams.
    3.Jane Eyre was accepted and was published in October 1847. It was a success from the first. ‘Decidedly the best novel of the season,’ said The Westminster Review, and other reviews followed suit.
    4.Charlotte’s brother, Branwell, the only son of the family, died of chronic bronchitis and marasmus exacerbated by heavy drinking in September 1848, although Charlotte believed his death was due to tuberculosis.
    5.Her book had sparked a movement in regards to feminism in literature.

  2. A Christmas Carol BY: Charles Dickens

    1. he had humiliating childhood experiences that are not directly described in A Christmas Carol, his conflicting feelings for his father as a result of those experiences are principally responsible for the dual personality of the stories protagonist.

    2. Dickens was not the first author to celebrate the Christmas season in literature.

    3. In a fund-raising speech on 5 October 1843 at the Manchester Athenæum (a charitable institution serving the poor), Dickens urged workers and employers to join together to combat ignorance with educational reform.

    4. The book received immediate critical acclaim.

    5. Dickens wrote in the wake of British government changes to the welfare system known as the Poor Laws.

  3. I’ve finished reading The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom. Here’s five thimgs I didn’t know about the author and the book:
    1. Corrie ten Boom was raised in a Dutch reformed church.
    2. She returned to Germany in 1946, even when it was her biggest fear.
    3. She was paralyzed by a stroke.
    4. Died on her 91st birthday.
    5. Her full name is Cornelia Arnolda Johanna ten Boom.

  4. I’ve finished reading Othello by Julius Lester. Here are five things I learned today that surprised me:
    1. Julius Ceaser was also a photographer.
    2. Ceaser was also a musician.
    3. He recorded two albums of folk music and original songs.
    4. In 1971 he began teaching in the Afro-American Studies department of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    5. In 1979 he married Alida Carolyn Fechner, who had a daughter, Elena Milad; the couple had a son, David Julius. The marriage ended in 1991. In 1995 he married Milan Sabatini; his stepdaughter from this marriage is performance artist Lián Amaris.

    • I think you mean Julius “Lester” not “Caesar” who was a Roman emperor. But I gave you points anyway, because I kept wanting to type “Caesar” whenever I’d make comments! It’s so tempting to do so!

      • I did that on almost every journal! I guess I didn’t notice it this time! 🙂

  5. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

    1.) She first titled her book “First Impression” because of the characters observations, but she changed it later to “Pride and Prejudice” because there observations were also there prejudices.

    2.) When she first published her book, Jane Austen did not place her name to the work; the title page simply read: Pride and Prejudice – By A Lady.

    3.) She wrote her second novel before she was 20 years old.

    4.) Pride and Prejudice has consistenly been her most popular novel. People say that it really showed how it was in the past days and how in depth it was for that time period. Also there were some scenes that were risky back them that happened between the men and woman.

    5.) The main actions of the novel are the interactions between opinions, ideas, and attitudes, which weaves and advances the plot of the novel. The emotions in the novel are to be perceived beneath the surface of the story and are not to be expressed to the readers directly. which people either hate or love, depends

  6. I’m reading EMMA by Jane Austen. I still haven’t finished the book, but I’m a lot closer than I was. I read about 100+ pages last night.
    1. Austen didn’t have a private study to write her novels in. She probably sat in the living room (or “sitting room” as they used to call it) with the rest of the family being noisy around her, while she wrote.
    2. She used a dinky little writing desk. Here’s a link w/ the picture: http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/jealmcds.html
    3. Jane austen considered Sir Walter Scott her rival.
    4. According to some stories, she had as many as four different guys that she fell in love with, but she never married any of them.
    5. England was at war with Revolutionary France during Jane Austen’s lifetime. Pretty much the whole time she was alive. I’m not sure how that effected her books though.

  7. 1. The Red Pony by John Steinbeck
    2.The first three chapters of The Red Pony were published in magazines from 1933–1936.
    3.The book has four different stories about Jody and his life on his father’s California ranch.
    4.He wrote a total of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books and five collections of short stories.
    5.In 1919, Steinbeck graduated from Salinas High School and attended Stanford University intermittently until 1925, eventually leaving without a degree.
    6.In 1933 Steinbeck published The Red Pony, a 100-page, four-chapter story weaving in memories of Steinbeck’s childhood

  8. I am done with The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss.

    1. There are many different editions to the book and not all of them are the same.
    2. In this time period when Wyss wrote the book a lot of other children books had been published about Christian-oriented morals.
    3. There was a comic book series based on the book. It was called Space Family Robinson.
    4. There is about seven movies based on the book as well.
    5. Jules Verne wrote a sequel to the book that took place at the time Wyss left off. It is called The Castaways of the Flag.

  9. I finished reading Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls.

    1. I learned that how in the book he was raised in the Ozarks he really was in real life. How Billy had three sisters Wilson Rawls also did. And how his mother home schooled him as well.

    2. Wilson Rawls lived in Idaho when he wrote this book.

    3.Wilson Rawls only wrote two books. “Where the Red Fern Grows” and “The Summer of the Monkeys” In which I have read both.

    4.Hos wife inspired him to re-write this book.

    5.She edited his book and got it published for him.

  10. I am done reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

    1.Mark Twain was not a real name it was a pen name.Samuel Langhorne Clemens was his real name.

    2.Mark Twain in real life is a river boats-man term meaning the water is deep enough to go through.

    3.Samuel was friends with presidents and European royalty.

    4.He lacked financial acumen. Though he made a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he squandered it on various ventures, in particular the Paige Compositor, and was forced to declare bankruptcy.

    5.Only three out of seven children survived in his family.

  11. Cannery Row by John Steinbeck
    1.The setting was in Monterey in California
    2.Cannery Row is a real place
    3.He used Cannery Row as a setting in two different books
    4.A real laboratory in Cannery Row was inspired to be Doc’s laboratory in the book
    5.He pictures the setting of the book just as it is in real life for the most part

  12. Roots by Alex Haley
    1. I learned that Roots was the top selling book for the “New York Times” for 20 weeks.
    2. I learned that there is a real place in Africa called Juffure where Alex had to reaearch. This is where Kunta was born.
    3. Alex Haley had to pay 650,000 dollars in fines for taking a few parts out of other books and putting them in his book.
    4. I learned that Alex Haley’s mother was related to Chicken George and he was related to Kizzy which was Kunta’s daughter.
    5. Alex Haley had to take 12 years to finish his research for the book Roots.

  13. I’m reading EMMA by Jane Austen. I still haven’t finished the book, but I’m a lot closer than I was. I read about 100+ pages last night.
    1. Austen didn’t have a private study to write her novels in. She probably sat in the living room (or “sitting room” as they used to call it) with the rest of the family being noisy around her, while she wrote.
    2. She used a dinky little writing desk. Here’s a link w/ the picture: http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/jealmcds.html

    ERG! The bell rang and I have to go to my next class. I’ll finish this later.

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